Boys & Girls Homes
4 Homes, 40 Beds
Ages 11-17
Centrally located

VQ Community programs are dedicated to providing a safe and structured environment. Here, youth are empowered to develop positive relationships, learn life skills and build the confidence to succeed as adults. VQ Community is about learning the ropes of being a successful contributor to society.  Our ultimate goal is for youth to move toward our pathway of transition, towards a foster home, adoption site, or our more specialized VQ Semi-Independent program.

VQ Fabric

VisionQuest history is rooted in American Indian culture. In American Indian traditions, the vision quest is a rite of passage that marks the transition from childhood to adulthood. VisionQuest has adopted many American Indian traditions over the years to help youth and their families grow together. The Native American ceremonies youth and staff participate in celebrate success, reinforce relationships, and assist in healthy conflict resolution. The circle, the way in which we conduct our meetings and ceremonies, facilitates communication and respects all perspectives. Within the context of this fabric, VisionQuest is constantly seeking better ways to deliver services. We have long embraced the use of evidence-based methodologies as a means of effectively responding to the needs of youth and their families.

The Sanctuary Model® Trauma-Informed Care

The Sanctuary Model® creates a safe environment for youth, families, and staff. It is a full-system approach which focuses on helping injured children recover from the damaging effect of interpersonal trauma. Through the Sanctuary Model®, youth and staff are committed to: Nonviolence, Emotional Intelligence, Social Learning, Democracy, Open Communication, Social Responsibility, and Growth and Change. Based on this model of trauma informed care, youth at these programs participate in weekly psycho-education groups in the areas of Safety, Emotion Management, Loss, and Future. The Sanctuary Model is considered to be an “evidence-supported” practice by the National Child Traumatic Stress Network, and a “promising practice” according to the California Evidence-Based Clearinghouse.

Public School & Charter Schools

VisionQuest believes that all youth are entitled to a quality education. VQ Community utilizes public and charter schools in Tucson, to match each child with the best learning environment possible. VQ Community case managers work closely with DCS case managers, educational liaisons, and each youth to help determine the best educational path for their educational goals. Youth placed at VQ Community programs can work towards their GED, or enroll in college courses after graduation. VisionQuest checks attendance daily, works closely with dropout specialists, and utilizes tutors to provide needed wrap around services. VQ values the strong relationships that have been formed with school principals and counselors, and believe these relationships contribute toward better educational experiences for their students.

Gender Specific Programming

VisionQuest utilizes best practices for gender specific programming. Research shows that girls thrive developmentally through building relationships and increasing connection with others. These relationships are promoted among peers and staff. The Madalyn home provides girls with decision-making and life skills that assist with their development into womanhood. Young women placed in the home learn empowerment skills which help encourage them to find their voice, to speak for themselves, and to recognize that they have choices.

Girls Circle© (Madalyn House)

The Girls Circle model, a structured support group for girls from 9-18 years, integrates relational theory, resiliency practices, and skills training in a specific format designed to increase positive connection, personal and collective strengths and competence in girls. Girls Circle does not aim to provide advice, but encourages girls to share experiences that are helpful to one another. Trained facilitators lead groups of girls through a format that includes each girl taking turns talking and listening to one another respectfully about their concerns and interests. The girls express themselves further through creative or focused activities such as role playing, drama, journaling, poetry, dance, and drawing. Girls Circle is designed in the evidence-based principles and practices of Motivational Interviewing and strength-based approaches. Girls Circle was selected for a gender-specific program evaluation by the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention.

The Council for Boys and Young Men

VisionQuest Mullany home for boys is excited to incorporate One Circle Foundation’s - The Council for Boys and Young Men curriculum at their home. The Council curriculum is a strengths-based group approach to promote boys' and young men's safe and healthy passage through pre-teen and adolescent years. In the group environment, boys and young men gain the vital opportunity to address masculine definitions and behaviors. The focused activities may include group challenges, games, roleplays, and art.

Topics may address:

  1. Bullying
  2. Safe expression of emotions
  3. Becoming allies with girls and women
  4. Making safe and health decisions for themselves

For more information about One Circle Foundation’s curriculum visit: www.onecirclefoundation.org

Frequently Asked Questions about VQ Community

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Q. Is my youth allowed personal electronics (Phone, Computer, Video Games)?
A. Yes, youth at the VQ Community can have personal electronics if approved by the youth’s case manager.
Q. Where will my youth attend School?
A. Youth at the VQ community program can either attend the home district high school, or middle school. Youth can also attend a charter school that will meet their individual needs.
Q. Will my youth be able to have community passes to go job searching?
A. Yes, youth at VQ Community programs have the privilege to have time out in the community. The length out in the community depends on the child’s age and length of time requested from the Case Manager.
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VQ Community Case Managers

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Madalyn House

Carmel Ross has been working for VisionQuest since 2012.

Carmel is the Case Manager for the Madalyn House. She is a native Arizonan and feels lucky to be reaching the youth at such a critical age. Carmel wants to be able to guide her young women in the right direction using positive reinforcement in a nurturing and safe environment. She feels that every child should get the support and encouragement needed in order to become a successful, productive, and positive young adult in society. Carmel hopes the youth in her home develop a strong sense of who they are, what they want out of life and fully believe that we support them in achieving anything that they set their minds to.

“Have a heart that never hardens, and a temper that never tires, and a touch that never hurts.”-Charles Dickens

Matt Hess

Mullaney House

Matt Hess has been working at VisionQuest since 2013 and has been involved in working with youth & families for the last 8 years.

Matt is the Case Manager for the Mullaney house. Matt’s objectives for his youth placed at the Mullaney programs are for each youth to achieve a goal no matter how small the goal. He values teaching youth to learn better communication skills in order to express themselves in a positive manner. Matt encourages youth to take those communication skills and apply them in everyday life outside of VisionQuest. Matt wants all his youth to leave with an improved sense of self-worth and self-respect and understand that hard work pays off and in return you gain a sense of accomplishment.

“If your actions inspire others to dream more, learn more, do more and become more you are a leader.”-John Quincy Adams

Barnes House & Blue Horse House

Kara Gouveia has worked for VisionQuest since 2013.

Kara has a Bachelor's degree in Anthropology from Northern Arizona University. Her study of Anthropology instilled in her a cultural sensitivity as well as a deep understanding of the support needed during times of transition. Kara believes that the type of support provided to youth in times of transition has a huge impact on how they move forward. Kara's approach to working with youth is one of non-judgement and empowerment. She is passionate about meeting the youth where they are and encouraging them to discover more about themselves, their strength, and what they want to create for their future. Kara strives to create a safe, positive, and nurturing environment for all of the youth she works with.

"Let yourself be silently drawn by the strange pull of what you really love. It will not lead you astray."- Rumi

Boys & Girls Homes
5 Homes, 23 Beds
Ages 16-18
Centrally located

VQ Fabric

VisionQuest history is rooted in American Indian culture. In American Indian traditions, the vision quest is a rite of passage that marks the transition from childhood to adulthood. VisionQuest has adopted many American Indian traditions over the years to help youth and their families grow together. The Native American ceremonies youth and staff participate in celebrate success, reinforce relationships, and assist in healthy conflict resolution. The circle, the way in which we conduct our meetings and ceremonies, facilitates communication and respects all perspectives. Within the context of this fabric, VisionQuest is constantly seeking better ways to deliver services. We have long embraced the use of evidence-based methodologies as a means of effectively responding to the needs of youth and their families.

The Sanctuary Model® Trauma-Informed Care

The Sanctuary Model® creates a safe environment for youth, families, and staff. It is a full-system approach which focuses on helping injured children recover from the damaging effect of interpersonal trauma. Through the Sanctuary Model®, youth and staff are committed to: Nonviolence, Emotional Intelligence, Social Learning, Democracy, Open Communication, Social Responsibility, and Growth and Change. Based on this model of trauma informed care, youth at these programs participate in weekly psycho-education groups in the areas of Safety, Emotion Management, Loss, and Future. The Sanctuary Model is considered to be an “evidence-supported” practice by the National Child Traumatic Stress Network, and a “promising practice” according to the California Evidence-Based Clearinghouse.

Foster Club Transitional Book

VQ Semi-Independent utilizes the Foster Club’s Transitional Toolkit to prepare youth for the transitional journey out of the foster care system and into adulthood. The curriculum focuses on 10 categories, Finances & Money Management, Permanence, Transportation, Job + Career, Education, Community Culture & Social Life, Life Skills, Self Care Health, Identity, and Housing, all which staff evaluate. Staff then help to sharpen skills in any area shown by youth to warrant more assistance. VQ allows youth placed in the program to “be in their own driver’s seat”; controlling their own futures. Youth learn what resources are available to them, how to develop a future plan, and what their readiness level is in each category of the toolkit. Youth are provided with a copy of this toolkit and are encouraged to use it while in the program and as a helpful tool when they graduate.

Motivational Interviewing (MI)

Motivational Interviewing is a form of collaborative conversation for strengthening a person’s own motivation and commitment to change. It is a person-centered counseling style and is designed to strengthen an individual’s motivation for and movement towards a specific goal, by exploring the person’s own motivations to change. The four core components of Motivational Interviewing are expressing empathy, roll with resistance, develop discrepancy, and support self-efficacy. Motivational Interviewing is a core component of many evidence-based practices and emerging best practices. Adding this model to the program provides VQ’s Semi-Independent staff with the proven tools to work with unmotivated and resistant teens who are aging out of the system.

Frequently Asked Questions about VQ Semi-Independent

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Q. How old does my youth need to be to attend a VQ Semi-Independent home?
A. Youth need to be at least 16½ years old.
Q. Can my youth stay after turning 18?
A. Youth can stay at a VQ Semi-Independent program after turning 18 years old. They will need to be enrolled in education or a vocational program.
Q. Can my youth attend college while at a VQ Semi-Independent home?
A. Yes, VQ Semi-Independent encourages youth to go further in their education. Many youth currently attend Pima Community College.
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Casey resized

VQ Semi-Independent Case Manager

Kacie Munson has been working at VisionQuest since 2011. She is from southern Arizona, and believes VisionQuest philosophy fits what she envisions for youth in her community. Kacie believes that each youth has the capabilities, resources, and most importantly, the right, to form a positive and meaningful life for themselves and their families. Kacie hopes to give her youth the tools necessary to understand their incredible individual value and to prepare them for a successful journey into adulthood.

“Give me one firm spot on which to stand and I will move the Earth.”

-Archimedes

Boys & Girls Homes
4 Homes, 20 Beds
Ages 5-17
Family Style Living

VQ Fabric

VisionQuest history is rooted in American Indian culture. In American Indian traditions, the vision quest is a rite of passage that marks the transition from childhood to adulthood. VisionQuest has adopted many American Indian traditions over the years to help youth and their families grow together. The Native American ceremonies youth and staff participate in celebrate success, reinforce relationships, and assist in healthy conflict resolution. The circle, the way in which we conduct our meetings and ceremonies, facilitates communication and respects all perspectives. Within the context of this fabric, VisionQuest is constantly seeking better ways to deliver services. We have long embraced the use of evidence-based methodologies as a means of effectively responding to the needs of youth and their families.

The Sanctuary Model® Trauma-Informed Care

The Sanctuary Model® creates a safe environment for youth, families, and staff. It is a full-system approach which focuses on helping injured children recover from the damaging effect of interpersonal trauma. Through the Sanctuary Model®, youth and staff are committed to: Nonviolence, Emotional Intelligence, Social Learning, Democracy, Open Communication, Social Responsibility, and Growth and Change. Based on this model of trauma informed care, youth at these programs participate in weekly psycho-education groups in the areas of Safety, Emotion Management, Loss, and Future. The Sanctuary Model is considered to be an “evidence-supported” practice by the National Child Traumatic Stress Network, and a “promising practice” according to the California Evidence-Based Clearinghouse.

Family Involvement

VQ Sibling aims to reunify siblings that are in care. Placing all siblings together results in less exposure of youth to trauma while separated from family. This program allows increased visitation on a regular basis which aims to support a faster transition home. At VQ Sibling, we help coordinate visits and transportation, as well as encourage families to communicate and support each other. The Sanctuary Model®, which is an evidence supported and trauma informed practice, provides the siblings with tools for coping, and growth. The goal is for youth to bring these tools learned with them when they reunify with their families.

Frequently Asked Questions about VQ Sibling

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Q. What ages are VQ Sibling?
A. Ages 5-17.
Q. Can you take sibling groups of boys and girls?
A. Yes, VQ Sibling homes are co-ed.
Q. How many youth are in each home?
A. VQ Sibling homes are small with 5 youth in each home. VQ Sibling homes create a family style living environment for sibling groups.
Q. Can youth’s families visit the home?
A. VQ Sibling can accommodate visits. VQ allows visits by the request and approval of case-manager.
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John resized

VQ Sibling Case Manager

John Meierdiercks has worked for VisionQuest since 2013 and has worked in the VQ Sibling program since it first opened in summer of 2013.

John strives to make VQ Sibling as close to a foster environment as possible. John believes it’s important that youth come home to the same expectations everyday: eat together, play together and live together. This stability allows the youth the opportunity to develop healthy relationships not just with their siblings but the other youth and staff in the program. John believes this environment empowers the youth to work on their own relationships outside the home, leading to more self-informed and future-facing choices.

“Don’t cry because it’s over, smile because it happened.”

-Dr. Seuss